Heritage Railway Stations

Locust Hill Station - Restored as a Community Centre

Locust Hill Station, built 1936, now restored at Markham Museum
Locust Hill Station, built 1936, now restored at Markham Museum

Built in 1936 by Canadian Pacific to replace another station which had burned to the ground, the Locust Hill station was one of the last rural stations ever built in the classic Canadian Railway Style.

No longer required by the railway after the cessation of passenger service to Locust Hill in the 1970s, the Locust Hill station faced the threat of demolition. It would have certainly been lost had it not been for the efforts of then Markham Museum Curator John Lunau, who spearheaded the drive to have the station relocated and preserved on the grounds of the Markham Museum in 1983.

Fully restored to its original condition, the station is today the focal point of the Railway exhibit area of the Markham Museum. Here it is complemented by such equipment as "Acadia", a CNR official car built in 1921 and once used by such dignitaries as Princess Margaret; a wooden C.P. caboose, built c.1940; CP rail snow plow (built in 1926) and a crossing signal (1932).

Unionville Station - Restored as a Community Centre

Unionvillle Station, built 1871, now restored on its original site as a community centre
Unionville Station, built 1871, now restored on its original site as a community centre

The Unionvillle Railway Station, was built in 1871 by the Toronto and Nipissing Railway company (Later Grand Trunk and CN). Originally, the line from Toronto to Cobobconk was laid with narrow gauge 3’-6” track.

The coming of the railway had a significant effect on the development of the community of Unionville, with much of the grain and other produce which previously was taken by horse team to Toronto diverted to the Unionville Station.

After years of neglect and a disastrous fire, the Unionville station faced the threat of demolition until acquired by the City in 1989, when it was restored to its original condition for use a community centre.

In addition to the station, the City also acquired the adjacent Stiver Mill, which is proposed to be restored by a private entrepreneur as part of a commercial development.

Markham Train Station Restoration Project

Markham Village, Toronto and Nippissing Station, c.1900
Markham Village, Toronto and Nippissing Station, c.1900

As a Millennium project, the City of Markham has purchased the former Markham Village Railway Station and in conjunction with the Markham Village Conservancy, are undertaking its restoration for use as a GO transit commuter rail station and community centre. The project is supported by Federal and local Millennium funding programs, as well as community fund-raising.