MARKHAM, ON – November 12, 2021 – The City of Markham is expanding opportunities for outdoor activity and recreation this Winter with the addition of five new outdoor public skating rinks, and by expanding its Pathway Maintenance Program from 8 to 95 pathways.

Residents will be able to enjoy outdoor skating at five new unrefrigerated ice rinks at Huntington Park, Victoria Square Park, Milliken Mills Park, Markham Museum, and Milne Dam Park. The City will construct and maintain these rinks which will be made available pending weather conditions. A flag system at each location will signal when the ice is safe to use. Onsite parking is available at all locations.

Together with the Markham Civic Centre outdoor refrigerated ice rink, these locations will provide easier access to residents in all parts of Markham, and offer safer and professionally maintained skating experiences.

A friendly reminder to stay off Markham’s ponds, stormwater ponds and waterways as the ice is unsafe and not maintained for recreation purposes. Ponds may contain salt from nearby roads and other debris, which can speed up thawing. Ice may appear thick, but it is unpredictable and some areas may have little to no ice. Stay safe and stay off natural ice.

Following the successful Pathway Winter Maintenance Pilot Project in 2020, the City of Markham is pleased to expand the program from 8 to 95 City asphalt or concrete pathways, for a total of 29.5 kilometers. These pathways will be cleared within 24 to 48 hours following the end of a Winter event where snow accumulation exceed 5 centimetres. For a list of pathways that are included in this program visit markham.ca/winter.

Markham is proud to deliver Winter maintenance services that meet and in many areas exceed provincial legislative service standards.

“The City of Markham is ready to tackle the elements with our robust Winter operations, while also providing new and enhanced leisure offerings for the community to enjoy,” said Markham Mayor Frank Scarpitti. “Coming off the success of last Winter’s Pathway Winter Maintenance program, we are delighted to announce that the program will grow from 8 pathways to 95 pathways across the City of Markham. There is no more Canadian winter activity than skating and we will be constructing and maintaining 5 new outdoor rinks to provide residents a safe and accessible leisure option. As always, we will continue to strive for service excellence to clear our roads and sidewalks of snow and limit the amount of salt used to ensure a sustainable future and to protect our planet.”

Everyone needs to be prepared and patient this Winter while our crews work hard to maintain and clear a network of more than 2,250 km of road and more than 1,150 km of sidewalk to keep our streets and neighbourhoods safe and moving.

The City of Markham uses weather monitoring technology and science-based practices to monitor roads before, during, and after bad weather to adjust to conditions and to ensure public safety. There are 241 personnel on standby 24/7, 146 road plows and driveway machines, 32 salt trucks and 54 sidewalk plows in our fleet.

When are roads plowed? How are roads plowed?

Road plowing in residential areas start at the end of the snowfall when snow reaches 7.5 centimetres (the length of a bank card or 3 inches) deep, and is usually complete within 12 to 16 hours after the end of a snowfall. Sidewalk plowing begins when snow reaches 5 centimetres (the length of a house key or 2 inches) deep, and is completed within 24 hours after the end of a snowfall.

Snow clearing starts with the largest, busiest roads — known as arterial or primary roads — that connect critical services such as hospitals, ambulance, fire stations, police and GO stations when snow reaches 3 centimetres (the length of a paper clip or 1.2 inches). Once clear, these main roads allow plows to reach secondary roads that serve schools, libraries, community centres, industrial and commercial areas. Finally, the plows can reach local roads and lanes which are usually in residential areas.

If you do not see plows immediately after a snowfall, please be patient and check the Winter Maintenance App at markham.ca/winter to find out their status.

What should you expect after the plows have left?

After plowing, it is normal for some snow to be left on the surface of roads and lanes especially on local roads. Busy moving traffic on busy arterial and secondary roads help melt the snow, creating a bare surface faster than residential roads with less traffic.

It is still safe to drive on snow-covered roads as long as drivers drive according to weather and road conditions. Slow down and give yourself extra time to arrive at your destination safely.

Brine, salt and sand are used to prevent roads from becoming icy. Remember, salt is only effective at temperatures of -12 degrees Celsius and above. The City’s Salt Management Plan promotes environmentally friendly salt use, storage and transportation.

What can you do to keep yourself and our community safe?

You can help protect your property and keep everyone safe. Please:

  • Clear snow away from fire hydrants and catch basins if you can do so safely.

  • Pile snow from your driveway onto the right side (when facing the road) of your driveway. This will mean less snow piled on your driveway by the plow as it passes your home.

  • Push snow away from the street. Pushing snow onto the street makes it unsafe for drivers and pedestrians in your neighbourhood - and it's illegal.

  • Park on the odd numbered side of the street from November 15 to April 15. If there is a snow storm or snowfall, you must remove your parked car from the road even if you have a permit . Plows are too big to squeeze past parked cars, delaying snow clearing for everyone.

Help for seniors and persons with a disability

If everyone in your household is a senior (60 years of age or older) or a person with a disability (12 to 60 years of age), you can apply for Markham's Snow Windrow Removal Assistance Program.

More information

Visit markham.ca or follow us on Twitter or Facebook (@cityofmarkham) for updates.

Read the latest Winter Maintenance Newsletter and access the Winter Maintenance App at markham.ca/winter.

Markham Mayor FrankScarpittiand City Councillors announcing the City's Winter Maintenance plans at the East Markham Operations Yard.

Markham Mayor Frank Scarpitti and City Councillors announcing the City's Winter Maintenance plans at the East Markham Operations Yard.

Markham Mayor Frank Scarpitti and City staff showing the City's Winter Maintenance equipment and supplies at the East Markham Operations Yard.

Markham Mayor Frank Scarpitti and City staff showing the City's Winter Maintenance equipment and supplies at the East Markham Operations Yard.

-30-

Markham Mayor Frank Scarpitti's Office:
At mayorscarpitti@markham.ca.

All other media inquiries / interview requests for the City of Markham:
Jennifer Yap, Coordinator, Communications and Media Relations at jyap@markham.ca or 437.229.2450.

For COVID-19 announcements from the City of Markham:
Visit markham.ca/covid19 or listen to 105.9 The Region – Markham’s information and emergency radio station.

About Markham: Markham, an award-winning municipality with over 351,000 residents and the largest of nine communities in York Region, is home to over 650 corporate head offices and more than 1,500 high tech and life science companies. Markham is a leader in attracting foreign direct investment with more than 240 foreign companies located in the City. Founded in the 1790s, today Markham is Canada’s most diverse community and enjoys a rich heritage, outstanding community planning and services, and a vibrant local economy. Markham has received the Excellence Canada Gold Award for Organizational Quality & Healthy Workplace, and multiple heritage and environmental awards.

Stay Connected: Visit our newsroom or search #MarkhamNews and #MarkhamEvents for the latest information on City programs, services and event.

MARKHAM, ON – November 12, 2021 – The City of Markham is expanding opportunities for outdoor activity and recreation this Winter with the addition of five new outdoor public skating rinks, and by expanding its Pathway Maintenance Program from 8 to 95 pathways.

Residents will be able to enjoy outdoor skating at five new unrefrigerated ice rinks at Huntington Park, Victoria Square Park, Milliken Mills Park, Markham Museum, and Milne Dam Park. The City will construct and maintain these rinks which will be made available pending weather conditions. A flag system at each location will signal when the ice is safe to use. Onsite parking is available at all locations.

Together with the Markham Civic Centre outdoor refrigerated ice rink, these locations will provide easier access to residents in all parts of Markham, and offer safer and professionally maintained skating experiences.

A friendly reminder to stay off Markham’s ponds, stormwater ponds and waterways as the ice is unsafe and not maintained for recreation purposes. Ponds may contain salt from nearby roads and other debris, which can speed up thawing. Ice may appear thick, but it is unpredictable and some areas may have little to no ice. Stay safe and stay off natural ice.

Following the successful Pathway Winter Maintenance Pilot Project in 2020, the City of Markham is pleased to expand the program from 8 to 95 City asphalt or concrete pathways, for a total of 29.5 kilometers. These pathways will be cleared within 24 to 48 hours following the end of a Winter event where snow accumulation exceed 5 centimetres. For a list of pathways that are included in this program visit markham.ca/winter.

Markham is proud to deliver Winter maintenance services that meet and in many areas exceed provincial legislative service standards.

“The City of Markham is ready to tackle the elements with our robust Winter operations, while also providing new and enhanced leisure offerings for the community to enjoy,” said Markham Mayor Frank Scarpitti. “Coming off the success of last Winter’s Pathway Winter Maintenance program, we are delighted to announce that the program will grow from 8 pathways to 95 pathways across the City of Markham. There is no more Canadian winter activity than skating and we will be constructing and maintaining 5 new outdoor rinks to provide residents a safe and accessible leisure option. As always, we will continue to strive for service excellence to clear our roads and sidewalks of snow and limit the amount of salt used to ensure a sustainable future and to protect our planet.”

Everyone needs to be prepared and patient this Winter while our crews work hard to maintain and clear a network of more than 2,250 km of road and more than 1,150 km of sidewalk to keep our streets and neighbourhoods safe and moving.

The City of Markham uses weather monitoring technology and science-based practices to monitor roads before, during, and after bad weather to adjust to conditions and to ensure public safety. There are 241 personnel on standby 24/7, 146 road plows and driveway machines, 32 salt trucks and 54 sidewalk plows in our fleet.

When are roads plowed? How are roads plowed?

Road plowing in residential areas start at the end of the snowfall when snow reaches 7.5 centimetres (the length of a bank card or 3 inches) deep, and is usually complete within 12 to 16 hours after the end of a snowfall. Sidewalk plowing begins when snow reaches 5 centimetres (the length of a house key or 2 inches) deep, and is completed within 24 hours after the end of a snowfall.

Snow clearing starts with the largest, busiest roads — known as arterial or primary roads — that connect critical services such as hospitals, ambulance, fire stations, police and GO stations when snow reaches 3 centimetres (the length of a paper clip or 1.2 inches). Once clear, these main roads allow plows to reach secondary roads that serve schools, libraries, community centres, industrial and commercial areas. Finally, the plows can reach local roads and lanes which are usually in residential areas.

If you do not see plows immediately after a snowfall, please be patient and check the Winter Maintenance App at markham.ca/winter to find out their status.

What should you expect after the plows have left?

After plowing, it is normal for some snow to be left on the surface of roads and lanes especially on local roads. Busy moving traffic on busy arterial and secondary roads help melt the snow, creating a bare surface faster than residential roads with less traffic.

It is still safe to drive on snow-covered roads as long as drivers drive according to weather and road conditions. Slow down and give yourself extra time to arrive at your destination safely.

Brine, salt and sand are used to prevent roads from becoming icy. Remember, salt is only effective at temperatures of -12 degrees Celsius and above. The City’s Salt Management Plan promotes environmentally friendly salt use, storage and transportation.

What can you do to keep yourself and our community safe?

You can help protect your property and keep everyone safe. Please:

  • Clear snow away from fire hydrants and catch basins if you can do so safely.

  • Pile snow from your driveway onto the right side (when facing the road) of your driveway. This will mean less snow piled on your driveway by the plow as it passes your home.

  • Push snow away from the street. Pushing snow onto the street makes it unsafe for drivers and pedestrians in your neighbourhood - and it's illegal.

  • Park on the odd numbered side of the street from November 15 to April 15. If there is a snow storm or snowfall, you must remove your parked car from the road even if you have a permit . Plows are too big to squeeze past parked cars, delaying snow clearing for everyone.

Help for seniors and persons with a disability

If everyone in your household is a senior (60 years of age or older) or a person with a disability (12 to 60 years of age), you can apply for Markham's Snow Windrow Removal Assistance Program.

More information

Visit markham.ca or follow us on Twitter or Facebook (@cityofmarkham) for updates.

Read the latest Winter Maintenance Newsletter and access the Winter Maintenance App at markham.ca/winter.

Markham Mayor FrankScarpittiand City Councillors announcing the City's Winter Maintenance plans at the East Markham Operations Yard.

Markham Mayor Frank Scarpitti and City Councillors announcing the City's Winter Maintenance plans at the East Markham Operations Yard.

Markham Mayor Frank Scarpitti and City staff showing the City's Winter Maintenance equipment and supplies at the East Markham Operations Yard.

Markham Mayor Frank Scarpitti and City staff showing the City's Winter Maintenance equipment and supplies at the East Markham Operations Yard.

-30-

Markham Mayor Frank Scarpitti's Office:
At mayorscarpitti@markham.ca.

All other media inquiries / interview requests for the City of Markham:
Jennifer Yap, Coordinator, Communications and Media Relations at jyap@markham.ca or 437.229.2450.

For COVID-19 announcements from the City of Markham:
Visit markham.ca/covid19 or listen to 105.9 The Region – Markham’s information and emergency radio station.

About Markham: Markham, an award-winning municipality with over 351,000 residents and the largest of nine communities in York Region, is home to over 650 corporate head offices and more than 1,500 high tech and life science companies. Markham is a leader in attracting foreign direct investment with more than 240 foreign companies located in the City. Founded in the 1790s, today Markham is Canada’s most diverse community and enjoys a rich heritage, outstanding community planning and services, and a vibrant local economy. Markham has received the Excellence Canada Gold Award for Organizational Quality & Healthy Workplace, and multiple heritage and environmental awards.

Stay Connected: Visit our newsroom or search #MarkhamNews and #MarkhamEvents for the latest information on City programs, services and event.